22 4 / 2014

gailsimone:

america-wakiewakie:

1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

Reblog a thousand times.

I have been poor. I have lived in serious poverty. 

I worked as hard then as I do now, and I work very hard indeed, as did almost everyone else I knew who was poor, regardless of background, ethnicity, or marriage status. 

We all know these things the wealthy and entitled say are lies…why do we allow that to continue to be the narrative?

(via siphersaysstuff)

22 4 / 2014

dungeonmaster11 asked: Right. Like, Cap was GIVEN his powers through a super-serum, and Reed, Sue, Johnny, and Ben were normal homo sapiens UNTIL they got a good dose of space radiation, and the same goes for other heroes like Ms. Marvel. The mutants were NEVER 'normal'. From their conception, they were 'different', and thus that makes it SO much easier for bigots in the MU to demonize and dehumanize them.

gailsimone:

That’s my thinking.

In the X-universe, people are not usually terrified of mutants (well, barring the really scary-looking ones) until they are identified as mutants.

I think that still holds up well with people who ‘pass’ as white or straight or cis or whatever. People are fine with them until they are identified differently.

Which is what makes it so sad. 

22 4 / 2014

smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularly,how do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

(Source: childrennow.org, via femfreq)

22 4 / 2014

iamuhura:

ruckawriter:

I rarely use this to just blog. I’m going to just blog now, so you can all just ignore this if it’s not to your liking.

Warning. Contents under pressure.

Read More

Wow. Greg Rucka is super for reals not here for your sexist bullshit in nerd or geek…

22 4 / 2014

(Source: alliartist, via starline)

22 4 / 2014

thefreelioness:

The NYPD tried to start a hashtag outpouring of positive memories with their police force. 

If this were ever a bad idea, it was probably the worst idea for arguably the most corrupt police force in America. 

via Vice:

What the person running the Twitter account probably failed to realize is that most people’s interactions with the cops fall into a few categories:

1. You are talking to them to get help after you or someone you knew was robbed, beaten, murdered, or sexually assaulted.

2. You are getting arrested. 

3. You are getting beaten by the police.

In category 1, you are probably not going to be like, “Oh, let me take a selfie with you fine officers so I can remember this moment,” and the other two categories are not things that the NYPD would like people on social media talking about. Additionally, the people who use Twitter a lot (and who aren’t Sonic the Hedgehog roleplayers) are the type who love fucking with authority figures. In any case, #myNYPD quickly became a trending topic in the United States, largely because people were tweeting and retweeting horrific images of police brutality perpetrated by New York City cops.

(via siphersaysstuff)

22 4 / 2014

metaknighty:

why do straight ppl think they can whine about gay ppl “throwing their sexuality in our faces” when almost every waking second of every minute of every day of my life is filled with heterosexual romance media and heteronormativity. like u think 2 girls holding hands in public is rubbing their sexuality in ur face you have no fucking idea what queer people go through on a daily basis shut the fuck up

(via lgbtlaughs)

22 4 / 2014

22 4 / 2014

diseonfire:

thepfa:

nohetero:

scottthepilgrim:

which fucking fedora wearing friendzoned nerd made this thing

yeah but notice that the seal’s intent is to eat those fish and the shark offers a mutually beneficial relationship for them
in which a dudebro unintentionally makes a really accurate analogy for the reason that they’re single forever

That’s a whale shark. They’re docile and in no way threatening to people or those fish depicted. Seals, by contrast, will attack people, possibly out of a frustrated sense of entitlement combined with poor socialization skills.

Well that backfired spectacularly.

diseonfire:

thepfa:

nohetero:

scottthepilgrim:

which fucking fedora wearing friendzoned nerd made this thing

yeah but notice that the seal’s intent is to eat those fish and the shark offers a mutually beneficial relationship for them

in which a dudebro unintentionally makes a really accurate analogy for the reason that they’re single forever

That’s a whale shark. They’re docile and in no way threatening to people or those fish depicted. Seals, by contrast, will attack people, possibly out of a frustrated sense of entitlement combined with poor socialization skills.

Well that backfired spectacularly.

(via wilwheaton)

22 4 / 2014

archiemcphee:

California-based Yarnboming artists Jill and Lorna Watt of Knits For Life (previously featured here) recently transformed a pair of unassuming benches near the San Francisco Ferry Building into adorably ferocious monsters, complete with six awesome orange feet. The irrepressibly inventive sisters created this delightful yarn installation for an upcoming episode of CCTV America’s new show Full Frame.

[via Laughing Squid]

💗

(via wilwheaton)